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Tell me what doesn't work with OpenVZ [message #9421] Tue, 02 January 2007 15:58 Go to next message
mperkel is currently offline  mperkel
Messages: 253
Registered: December 2006
Senior Member
From: *ctyme.com
I know this is a rather general question but I'm wondering what kinds of things I might run into that's not going to work that not obvious. Like I know that grub-install isn't going to work because there's no boot directory. I suppose I want to be forewarned as to what issues I'm likely to run into.

If I put a person in a VPSwho was used to dedicated, what kinds of things might they run into that is likely to not work? Also, if someone were to use a VPS what kinds of things can they do to screw up the system?

What do I need to watch out for or be aware of?


Re: Tell me what doesn't work with OpenVZ [message #10652 is a reply to message #9421] Sun, 25 February 2007 20:44 Go to previous messageGo to next message
bradmkjr is currently offline  bradmkjr
Messages: 10
Registered: September 2006
Junior Member
From: *109.156.222-mwtv.mso.montana.com
Good Question,

The first thing any dedicated conversion will notice is the way ram is reported. I currently have my hosting done on a Virtuozzo, and I noticed right away that plesk always reports very little free Ram. So this is something you will want to make very clear is how much ram each user gets, and how it is allocated.

As far as general people to avoid, is anyone who thinks they can install Windows onto your VPS or want to change to a different distro every week. (that would be a great opportunity to sell them multiple accounts if you wanted to try that)

Hope that gives some insight
Bradford Knowlton
http://x86Virtualization.com/
Re: Tell me what doesn't work with OpenVZ [message #11358 is a reply to message #9421] Tue, 20 March 2007 22:24 Go to previous messageGo to next message
sPENKMAN is currently offline  sPENKMAN
Messages: 7
Registered: March 2007
Location: Arnhem, Netherlands
Junior Member
From: *ftth.xms.internl.net
I agree with bradmkjr, memory management is an issue but a lot can be done by tuning your system like lowering the apache spare processes which can easely save you 50 - 100MB memory.

At my work we also use Virtuozzo and our biggest VE's can use 256MB ram at peak to 512MB. An VE equipped with Plesk (with about 26 domains), ClamAV, Spamassasin and some minor programs can use up to 450MB ram.

In my experience running Tomcat within a VE is not done unless you have 512MB + memory. Tomcat uses around 400MB, next to that you might want to run MySQL with also can consume quite some memory.

For the rest... you can do an awfull lot of things Smile


When you think you have fixed it, something else will fail soon enough
Re: Tell me what doesn't work with OpenVZ [message #11899 is a reply to message #11358] Wed, 11 April 2007 08:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
jarcher is currently offline  jarcher
Messages: 91
Registered: August 2006
Location: Smithfield, Rhode Island
Member
From: *ri.ri.cox.net
I am amazed by the amount of kernel memory used by Debian's apt-get program. I need to set it to something like 40MB to prevent apt-get from failing.

Fortunatly, I can use Etch AMD64, so I have plenty of "low memory" to play with (it's all low memory - 8GB). Still, I find myself allocating guarantees of 300MB+ to VPSes just to get them to do useful stuff. I thought I would be able to get away with quite a lot less. For many tasks OpenVZ is still better than VMware, though, since in reality I can over-commit much more heavily with OpenVZ.

Re: Tell me what doesn't work with OpenVZ [message #12015 is a reply to message #11899] Sat, 14 April 2007 18:03 Go to previous message
bradmkjr is currently offline  bradmkjr
Messages: 10
Registered: September 2006
Junior Member
From: *hlna.qwest.net
I feel that "Over committing" is the heart to virtualization. If you take a standard server box and hard slice it evenly 4 ways, you might end up with 4 systems with 1.3 Ghz processors (2.6 dual core), 2 gig of ram (8 gig total), 50 gig hard drive (200 gig drive), and 250 meg per second nic (gigabit / 4), etc.. Which might be fine for some situations. But if you use a product where you can do virtual hard drives, virtual nics, and over committing the ram, then you could end up with 4 boxes with the full 2.6 dual core cpu, 6 to 8 gig of ram, virtual drives which will dynamically expand, and full use of the nic when they need the power, and share it when they don't.

Bradford Knowlton
http://x86Virtualization.com


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