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ext3 minimum reserved blocks [message #27908] Sun, 02 March 2008 14:13 Go to next message
charlesl
Messages: 4
Registered: March 2008
Junior Member
I'm installing OpenVZ on Debian with the following disk partitions (on a RAID1 mirror in fact), all ext3 formatted:

100MB /boot
3.5GB /
480GB /var/lib/vz
16GB /swap

I've chosen ext3 because of bad stories about reiserfs corrupting randomly or on powerdowns/hard reboots, and that XFS isn't compatible with the OpenVZ quota system.

Couple of things. Firstly: is the /boot partition large enough to hold the OpenVZ kernel as well as my Debian kernel (35MB)?

Secondly: I've "lost" in the region of 25GB of disk space on my VZ partition because of the 5% ext3 reserved blocks. If I had a purely data partition I could apparently decrease this to zero (i.e. disable reserved blocks) without any problems, but I'm not sure what the minimum recommended level is for OpenVZ - 25GB seems an awful lot and is needlessly consuming that otherwise free disk space! I've done exactly as the install guide recommends and put root on a separate partition of its own, so even if the VZ partition becomes completely full I still have root access to the HN and presumably could therefore manage the VZ partition to rectify any problems?

So, do you have a recommendation of the minimum reserved block size with justification? Can I decrease it to zero and still be safe in the event of a full VZ partition?

Thanks for your help.
Re: ext3 minimum reserved blocks [message #27928 is a reply to message #27908] Mon, 03 March 2008 12:07 Go to previous message
koct9i is currently offline  koct9i
Messages: 51
Registered: February 2008
Member
if don`t need debug kernels /boot will contain only vmlinuz, vmlinux, System.map and initrd == ~15Mb per kernel.

decrease reserved to zero is save for vz, but ext3 will badly fragmented and decrease performance at full space utilization.
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